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trainer

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

PETA SA Our Strategic objectives

The PETA-SAs sole objective is to improve teaching, training and learning, through supporting individual practitioners in memberships through a professional body to the best of their ability across the full diversity of the sector. We do this by delivering our three strategic priorities:

  • by giving benefits and especially professional development to practitioners;
  • by according status in recognition of expertise;
  • and by giving a voice so that learning and teaching professional can inform policy.

Despite recent progress, teachers and trainers in further education and skills remain under recognised in the public domain and policy making circles, and in comparison with both other professional.

Membership of the PETA-SA is part of individuals investing time and commitment to their own professionalism. The association, as is typical of professional bodies, also seeks to draw in new resources and financial investment that otherwise would not be available to professionals or the sector. In this way, we support the drive for excellence in teaching and training beyond what the state and employers can support.

Leaders and managers across the further education and skills sector benefit from encouraging and supporting teaching and training practitioners on their professional journey through membership. Utilising professional body membership and the services for individuals also benefits colleges and providers, as we have described in this document, dual professionals are able to provide a holistic and powerful learning experience through course content that is contextualised for up-to-date industry practices, developments and leading edge teaching, learning and assessment methods. PETA-SA seeks to ensure that quality of teaching and learning is at its highest possible and promotes a constructive dialogue between industry and providers and teaching and learning professionals.

Train the Trainer Course

117871 Facilitate learning using a variety of given methodologies also known as Train the Trainer course.

 

Train the Trainer course or facilitator course is a component of continuous professional career development for those aspiring to supervisory or management positions or who is a freelancer, where training is a vital competence. This train the trainer course is often seen as a stepping stone towards enhancing a career in the field of training, learning and development, Human Resources, freelancing as well as supervisory and management roles. This course provides for an introduction to the general principles of learning and development and an insight into the training cycle. The facilitator course is highly interactive and fast paced. Skills on how to prepare, deliver and review training sessions are dealt with on both theoretical and practical levels. This is a challenging and exciting course from which, both participants and organisations gain great benefits.

 

Train the Trainer course outcomes

  • Understanding training needs.
  • Identifying training needs.
  • Determining the session design.
  • Planning and developing a training session.
  • Conducting a training session.
  • Assessing and evaluating training.

 

This unit standard will provide recognition for those who facilitate or intend to facilitate learning using a variety of given methodologies also called train the trainer. Formal recognition will enhance their employability and also provide a means to identify competent learning facilitators.

 

People credited with this unit standard are able to:

  • Plan and prepare for facilitation;
  • Facilitate learning; and
  • Evaluate learning and facilitation.

 

The following knowledge is embedded within the unit standard, and will be assessed directly or implicitly through assessment of the specific outcomes in terms of the assessment criteria:

  • The sector and workplace skills plans.
  • At least three methodologies for facilitating learning.
  • Strategies, techniques and activities for using the kinds of support materials and/or equipment appropriate to facilitation methodologies.
  • Methods for evaluating learning and facilitation.
  • Psychology of group dynamics.
  • Outcomes-based approach to learning.
  • Forms of practice that promote the values described in the Bill of Rights and the principles underpinning the National Qualifications Framework and Employment Equity Act.

 

Train the Trainer – Getting Started

 

Do you want your staff to get the most out of on-the-job training? Whether a result of employee or process changes, ensuring your people receive consistent and useful training is vital for the success of any organisation. Effective on-the-job training engages employees and ensures they understand and retain the information and skills required to do their job well. This one day workshop provides the basics in training skills for the workplace trainer. You will learn practical strategies and techniques to deliver training in a way that is meaningful and useful to participants. It includes an insight into the needs of adult learners, and the common barriers and solutions which a trainer may experience during the training session.

 

The following topics will be covered:

  • identifying principles of adult learning
  • identifying the training need
  • delivering training for the workplace
  • tips for using tools and props during the delivery
  • the role of evaluation and feedback
  • the process of reflection and review.

 

On completing this course you will be able to:

  • understand key adult learning principles
  • identify and determine training needs
  • employ delivery skills for facilitating to small groups
  • understand the role of preparation in training delivery
  • identify the function of evaluation and review.

 

Enrol for our Train the trainer course today and start your freelance career as a qualified Facilitator.

 

 

Differentiate between Educators and Trainers

Lecturer   

A lecture (from the French ‘lecture’, meaning ‘reading’ [process]) is an oral presentation intended to present information or teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. Lectures are used to convey critical information, history, background, theories, and equations. Usually the lecturer will stand at the front of the room and recite information relevant to the lecture’s content.

Teacher   

Teacher takes charge of the learning environment. The teacher is responsible for creating lesson plans that direct the course of study students follow. Clear and concise objectives delineate what the student learns on any given day. The teacher is responsible for measuring how much information the student learns. Evaluation is often in the form of tests, but the teacher may use other measurement tools to determine if the student met the teacher’s learning objectives.

Presenter    

Presentations can be of various types, depending on whether the presentation is intended to:

  • Sell
  • Inform
  • Motivate
  • Persuade
  • Advocate
  • Persuade
  • Entertain
  • Educate

Facilitator 

Facilitators might not be subject area experts. They do have special training in group dynamics, using processes such as conflict resolution, strategic planning and team building. In any group setting, a facilitator can quickly determine what the group knows so the group can proceed to build on that knowledge. By asking questions and keeping the group focused, a facilitator helps the group establish a set of ground rules, as well as its own learning objectives. The facilitator also helps the group evaluate what group members learned from their activities.

Trainer  

Students/learners come to the occasion prepared or expecting to learn. In addition, a trainer has more knowledge than the audience on the given topic. For example, someone who teaches an advanced Excel class should have more skill than those who come to class to learn.

PETA SA Our Strategic objectives

The PETA-SAs sole objective is to improve teaching, training and learning, through supporting individual practitioners in memberships through a professional body to the best of their ability across the full diversity of the sector. We do this by delivering our three strategic priorities:

  • by giving benefits and especially professional development to practitioners;
  • by according status in recognition of expertise;
  • and by giving a voice so that learning and teaching professional can inform policy.

Despite recent progress, teachers and trainers in further education and skills remain under recognised in the public domain and policy making circles, and in comparison with both other professional.

Membership of the PETA-SA is part of individuals investing time and commitment to their own professionalism. The association, as is typical of professional bodies, also seeks to draw in new resources and financial investment that otherwise would not be available to professionals or the sector. In this way, we support the drive for excellence in teaching and training beyond what the state and employers can support.

Leaders and managers across the further education and skills sector benefit from encouraging and supporting teaching and training practitioners on their professional journey through membership. Utilising professional body membership and the services for individuals also benefits colleges and providers, as we have described in this document, dual professionals are able to provide a holistic and powerful learning experience through course content that is contextualised for up-to-date industry practices, developments and leading edge teaching, learning and assessment methods. PETA-SA seeks to ensure that quality of teaching and learning is at its highest possible and promotes a constructive dialogue between industry and providers and teaching and learning professionals.

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