SDF

Leadership Styles – Important Leadership Styles

All leaders do not possess same attitude or same perspective. As discussed earlier, few leaders adopt the carrot approach and a few adopt the stick approach. Thus, all of the leaders do not get the things done in the same manner. Their style varies. The leadership style varies with the kind of people the leader interacts and deals with. A perfect/standard leadership style is one which assists a leader in getting the best out of the people who follow him.

Some of the important leadership styles are as follows:

Autocratic leadership style: In this style of leadership, a leader has complete command and hold over their employees/team. The team cannot put forward their views even if they are best for the team’s or organizational interests. They cannot criticize or question the leader’s way of getting things done. The leader himself gets the things done. The advantage of this style is that it leads to speedy decision-making and greater productivity under leader’s supervision. Drawbacks of this leadership style are that it leads to greater employee absenteeism and turnover. This leadership style works only when the leader is the best in performing or when the job is monotonous, unskilled and routine in nature or where the project is short-term and risky.

  • The Laissez Faire Leadership Style: Here, the leader totally trusts their employees/team to perform the job themselves. He just concentrates on the intellectual/rational aspect of his work and does not focus on the management aspect of his work. The team/employees are welcomed to share their views and provide suggestions which are best for organizational interests. This leadership style works only when the employees are skilled, loyal, experienced and intellectual.
  • Democrative/Participative leadership style: The leaders invite and encourage the team members to play an important role in decision-making process, though the ultimate decision-making power rests with the leader. The leader guides the employees on what to perform and how to perform, while the employees communicate to the leader their experience and the suggestions if any. The advantages of this leadership style are that it leads to satisfied, motivated and more skilled employees. It leads to an optimistic work environment and also encourages creativity. This leadership style has the only drawback that it is time-consuming.
  • Bureaucratic leadership: Here the leaders strictly adhere to the organizational rules and policies. Also, they make sure that the employees/team also strictly follows the rules and procedures. Promotions take place on the basis of employees’ ability to adhere to organizational rules. This leadership style gradually develops over time. This leadership style is more suitable when safe work conditions and quality are required. But this leadership style discourages creativity and does not make employees self-contented.
  • Originally posted 2013-09-21 17:18:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Re: Purpose of the Appeals Process

    Appeals can be brought against:

    • Assessments that are perceived to have been unfair, invalid or unreliable.
    • The assessment outcome, if the assessor’s judgement is considered to be biased.
    • Inadequate expertise or experience of the assessor, if this is considered to have influenced the assessment.
    • Unethical practices.
    • Learners should be secure in the knowledge that they can appeal against an unfair assessment.
    • Every candidate being assessed and or moderated has the right to appeal against the decisions, conduct or compliance of the assessor or moderator.
    • All candidates shall be familiarized with proper appeals procedure.

    Originally posted 2013-09-26 14:57:16. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION

    REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCREDITATION

    In order to become accredited with the SETA, an education and training provider must fulfill the following requirements:

    have a shared primary focus with the SETA;
    not be registered with another ETQA;
    be registered in terms of applicable legislation;
    have in place an acceptable quality management system (QMS);
    have the ability to develop, deliver and evaluate learning programmes which culminate in specified standards or qualifications;
    have in place financial, administrative and physical resources;
    have in place policies and practices for staff selection, appraisal and development;
    have in place policies and practices for learner entry, guidance and support.

    Originally posted 2013-09-18 16:38:12. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Leadership and Management – Relationship & Differences

    Leadership and management are the terms that are often considered synonymous. It is essential to understand that leadership is an essential part of effective management. As a crucial component of management, remarkable leadership behaviour stresses upon building an environment in which each and every employee develops and excels. Leadership is defined as the potential to influence and drive the group efforts towards the accomplishment of goals. This influence may originate from formal sources, such as that provided by acquisition of managerial position in an organization.

    A manager must have traits of a leader, i.e., he must possess leadership qualities. Leaders develop and begin strategies that build and sustain competitive advantage. Organizations require robust leadership and robust management for optimal organizational efficiency.

    Differences between Leadership and Management Leadership differs from management in a sense that:

  • While managers lay down the structure and delegates authority and responsibility, leaders provides direction by developing the organizational vision and communicating it to the employees and inspiring them to achieve it.
  • While management includes focus on planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling; leadership is mainly a part of directing function of management. Leaders focus on listening, building relationships, teamwork, inspiring, motivating and persuading the followers.
  • While a leader gets his authority from his followers, a manager gets his authority by virtue of his position in the organization.
  • While managers follow the organization’s policies and procedure, the leaders follow their own instinct.
  • Management is more of science as the managers are exact, planned, standard, logical and more of mind. Leadership, on the other hand, is an art. In an organization, if the managers are required, then leaders are a must/essential.
  • While management deals with the technical dimension in an organization or the job content; leadership deals with the people aspect in an organization.
  • While management measures/evaluates people by their name, past records, present performance; leadership sees and evaluates individuals as having potential for things that can’t be measured, i.e., it deals with future and the performance of people if their potential is fully extracted.
  • If management is reactive, leadership is proactive.
  • Management is based more on written communication, while leadership is based more on verbal communication.
  • The organizations which are over managed and under-led do not perform upto the benchmark. Leadership accompanied by management sets a new direction and makes efficient use of resources to achieve it. Both leadership and management are essential for individual as well as organizational success.

    Originally posted 2013-09-21 17:18:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Coordination and Cooperation

    Co-ordination is an orderly arrangement of efforts to provide unity of action in the fulfillment of common objective whereas co-operation denotes collective efforts of persons working in an enterprise voluntarily for the achievement of a particular purpose. It is the willingness of individuals to help each other.

    Co-ordination is an effort to integrate effectively energies of different groups whereas co-operation is sort to achieve general objectives of business.

    Though these two are synonymous but they are different as below:

    Differences between Co-ordination and Co-operation

    Basis Co-ordination Co-operation
    Meaning It is an orderly arrangement of group efforts in pursuit of common goals. It means mutual help willingly.
    Scope It is broader than co-operation which includes as well because it harmonizes the group efforts. It is termed as a part of co-ordination.
    Process The function of co-ordination is performed by top management. The functions of co-operation are prepared by persons at any level.
    Requirements Co-ordination is required by employees and departments at work irrespective of their work. Co-operation is emotional in nature because it depends on the willingness of people working together.
    Relationship It establishes formal and informal relationships. It establishes informal relationship.
    Freedom It is planned and entrusted by the central authority & it is essential. It depends upon the sweet will of the individuals and therefore it is not necessary.
    Support It seeks wholehearted support from various people working at various levels. Co-operation without co-ordination is fruitless & therefore it may lead to unbalanced developments.

    Therefore, existence of co-operation may prove to be effective condition or requisite for co-ordination. But it does not mean that co-ordination originates automatically from the voluntary efforts of the group of members. It has to be achieved through conscious & deliberate efforts of managers, therefore to conclude we can say that co-operation without co-ordination has no fruit and co-ordination without co-operation has no root.

     

    Originally posted 2013-10-05 10:36:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Re: How does affirmative action and skills shortage affect recruitment?

    SUITABLY QUALIFIED CANDIDATES

    According to the EEA, suitably qualified employees from designated groups must have equal opportunity and be equitably represented on all occupational levels. The employer achieves this by appointing suitably qualified candidates, ether from the internal or external pool of candidates. This must be achieved through affirmative action measures being applied and implemented. The question to be asked is when is a designated person suitably qualified for a position? Clearly, designated people are previously disadvantaged and therefore do not have the necessary skill, education training, qualification or experience. If these qualifications are set for all the candidates in the organisation, then the unfairness will be perpetuated as the designated groups will again fall foul due to a lack of skills, training, qualification or experience.

    For this purpose the EEA defines suitably qualified people for the purpose of affirmative action in section 20(3). It should be noted that Section 15 of Chapter 3 specifically states that affirmative action measures are measures designed to ensure that suitably qualified people have equal employment opportunities and are equitably represented in all categories and levels of the workforce. There is therefore no requirement on a designated employer to apply affirmative action measures to people who are not suitably qualified. Although, it is the prerogative of the employer to make provision for people who are not suitably qualified, by way of training, development, mentorship, counselling, etc.

    According to the EEA, a person may be suitably qualified for a job as a result of any one of, or a combination of:

    that person’s formal qualifications;

      *prior learning;
      *relevant experience; or
      *the capacity to acquire within a reasonable time the ability to do the job.

    During the recruitment process of an AA candidate, the employer must take all or some of the above factors into consideration when deciding whether a person is suitably qualified and may not unfairly discriminate against the person solely on the grounds of that candidate’s lack of experience. A lack of experience will therefore be unfair unless the employer can make out a good case as to why experience would be necessary for a specific position (core function or inherent requirement).

    Originally posted 2013-10-13 10:05:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    What is Applied Competence?

    Applied competence means an integration of the knowledge, the skills, the attitudes and the applications that a learner is able to perform in a way that suits the learning context. It is described as the foundational (knowledge), the practical (skills) and the reflexive (application in context) competence which the learner needs in order to be judged fully competent.

    Originally posted 2013-10-08 12:48:23. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Staff Motivation – Motivation Tips for Employees

    Employees are the building blocks of an organization. Organizational success depends on the collective efforts of the employees. The employees will collectively contribute to organizational growth when they are motivated.

    Below mentioned are some tips for motivating the staff/employees in an organization:

    Evaluate yourself- In order to motivate, encourage and control your staff’s behaviour, it is essential to understand, encourage and control your own behaviour as a manager. Work upon utilizing your strengths and opportunities to neutralize and lower the negative impact of your weaknesses and organizational threats. The manager should adopt the approach “You’re OK – I’m OK”.

    Be familiar with your staff– The manager should be well acquainted with his staff. The more and the better he knows his staff, the simpler it is to get them involved in the job as well as in achieving the team and organizational goals. This will also invite staff’s commitment and loyalty. A cordial superior-subordinate relationship is a key factor in job-satisfaction.

    Provide the employees certain benefits– Give your staff some financial and other benefits. Give them bonuses, pay them for overtime, and give them health and family insurance benefits. Make sure they get breaks from work. Let them enjoy vacations and holidays.

    Participate in new employees induction programme– Induction proceeds with recruitment advertising. At this point of time, the potential entrants start creating their own impressions and desires about the job and the organization. The manner in which the selection is conducted and the consequent recruitment process will either build or damage the impression about the job and organization. Thus, the manager must have a say in framing the advertisement and also in the selection and recruitment process. After the decision about the candidate is made, the manager must take personal interest in the selected joinee’s joining date, the family relocation issues, cost of removal, etc. Being observed by the new recruit and your entire team / staff to be involved completely, will ensure a persuasive entry in the organization.

    Provide feedback to the staff constantly-
    The staff members are keen to know how they are performing. Try giving a regular and constructive feedback to your staff. This will be more acceptable by the staff. Do not base the feedback on assumptions, but on facts and personal observations. Do not indulge in favouritism or comparing the employee with some one else. Sit with your staff on daily or weekly basis and make sure that feedback happens. This will help in boosting employee’s morale and will thus motivate the staff.

    Acknowledge your staff on their achievements– A pat on the back, some words of praise, and giving a note of credit to the employee / staff member at personal level with some form of broad publicity can motivate the staff a lot. Make it a point to mention the staff’s outstanding achievements in official newsletters or organization’s journal. Not only acknowledge the employee with highest contribution, but also acknowledge the employee who meets and over exceeds the targets.

    Ensure effective time management– Having control over time ensures that things are done in right manner. Motivate your staff to have “closed” times, i.e., few hours when there are no interruptions for the staff in performing their job role so that they can concentrate on the job, and “open” times when the staff freely communicate and interact. Plan one to one sessions of interaction with your staff where they can ask their queries and also can get your attention and, thereby, they will not feel neglected. This all will work in long run to motivate the staff.

    Have stress management techniques in your organization- Create an environment in which you and your staff can work within optimum pressure levels. Ensure an optimistic attitude towards stress in the workplace. Have training sessions on stress management, and ensure a follow-up with group meetings on the manner stress can be lowered at work. Give your staff autonomy in work. Identify the stress symptoms in employees and try to deal with them.

    Use counselling technique– The employees’ / staff feelings towards the work, their peer, their superiors and towards the future can be effectively dealt through the staff counseling. Counselling provides an environment, incentive and support which enable the employee to achieve his identity.

    Give the employees learning opportunities– Employees should consistently learn new skills on the job. It has been well said by someone that with people hopping jobs more often than required and organizations no longer giving job security to employees, the young blood employees specifically realize that continuing learning is the best way to remain employable. Opportunities should be given to the employees to develop their skills and competencies and to make best use of their skills. Link the staff goals with the organizational goals.

    Set an example for your staff / subordinates– Be a role model for your staff. The staff would learn from what you do and not from what you say / claim. The way you interact with your clients / customers and how do you react later after the interaction is over have an impact upon the staff. The staff more closely observes your non-verbal communication (gestures, body language). Being unpunctual, wasting the organization’s capital, mismanaging organization’s physical equipments, asking the staff to do your personal work, etc. all have a negative impact on the staff. Try setting an example for your staff to follow.

    Smile often- Smiling can have a tremendous effect on boosting the morale of the staff. A smiling superior creates an optimistic and motivating work environment. Smiling is an essential component of the body language of confidence, acceptance and boldness. Smile consistently, naturally and often, to demonstrate that you feel good and positive about the staff who works for you. It encourages new ideas and feedback from the staff. The staff does not feel hesitant and threatened to discuss their views this way.

    Listen effectively– Listening attentively is a form of recognizing and appreciating the person who is talking. Reciprocal / Mutual listening develops cordial and healthy personal relationships on which the employee / staff development rests. If the managers do not listen attentively to the subordinates, the morale of the subordinates lowers down and they do not feel like sharing their ideas or giving their views. Effective listening by the manager boosts up the employees’ morale and thus motivates them.

    Ensure effective communication- In order to motivate your staff, indulge in effective communication such as avoid using anger expressions, utilize questioning techniques to know staff’s mindset and analysis rather than ordering the staff what to do, base your judgements on facts and not on assumptions, use relaxed and steady tone of voice, listen effectively and be positive and helpful in your responses. Share your views with the staff.

    Develop and encourage creativity- The staff should be encouraged to develop the creativity skills so as to solve organizational problems. Give them time and resources for developing creativity. Let them hold constant brainstorming sessions. Invite ideas and suggestions from the staff. They may turn out to be very productive.

    Don’t be rigid. Be flexible- Introduce flexibility in work. Allow for flexible working hours if possible. Let the employees work at home occasionally if need arises. Do not be rigid in accepting ideas from your staff. Stimulate flexible attitudes in the employees who are accountable to you by asking what changes they would like to bring about if given a chance.

    Adopt job enrichment- Job enrichment implies giving room for a better quality of working life. It means facilitating people to achieve self-development, fame and success through a more challenging and interesting job which provides more promotional and advancement opportunities. Give employees more freedom in job, involve them in decision-making process, show them loyalty and celebrate their achievements.

    Respect your team- Respect not only the employees’ rights to share and express their views, and to be themselves, but their time too. This will ensure that the employees respect you and your time. Make the staff feel that they are respected not just as employees / workers but as individuals too.

    Originally posted 2013-10-05 08:52:22. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    BEGINNERS: SETA Accreditation, SDF and Grants explained – Workshop Durban R50 morning 23rd of March 16

    SETA Accreditation and Skills Development

    Workshop for Beginners!

    * * Anyone is welcome – bookings essential for catering purposes **

    DURBAN ONLY  – R50 p/person – 4 hours!

    (8am to 12am 23rd of March 16)

    * * * Topics to be covered * * *

    1. We Will Explain:

    • Accreditation: the different types, their characteristics and how to get accredited.
    • How to lodge a complaint against a SETA, process or person.

    2. And Discuss Answers To These Frequently Asked Questions:

    • What are scarce and critical skills?
    • Where does one find details or processes to apply for funding from a SETA?
    • What are the benefits of participating in SETA projects like WSP and ATR?
    • Why a qualified Skills Development Facilitator?

    The workshop is open for anyone who’d like to learn more about TRAINYOUCAN, Accreditation and Skills Development practices.

    Ideal for those currently acting as a Skills Development Facilitator or in any related Training or Human Resource positions who have not completed any training-related courses in the past.

    Join us for a cup of Coffee & Muffin @The Venue in Westville (Durban – Varsity College) on the 23rd of March 2016.

    • Cost: R50 per person. 
    • Venue:  The Venue. (Next to Varsity College in Westville)      
    • Time: 8am to 12am
    • Date: 23rd March 16
    • Speaker: Ezra Steenkamp
    trainyoucanfb logo

     

    Originally posted 2016-03-01 08:57:06. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

    Employment Equity Act of 1998

    The purpose of this Act is to achieve equity in the workplace by promoting equal opportunity and fair treatment in employment through elimination of unfair discrimination and implementing affirmative action measures to redress the disadvantages in employment experienced by designated groups, in order to ensure equitable representation in all occupational categories and levels in the workforce.

    This Act provides for additional reporting requirements employers with the additional burden of submitting an Employment Equity Report.

    All designated employers must, in terms of Section 21 of the Employment Equity Act of 1998 submit their annual report for the 2013 reporting period by 1 October 2013, if you submit manually or post. Reports cannot be submitted via e-mail or fax.

    The Department of Labour has also launched an Employment Equity Online Reporting System where reports can be submitted electronically. The deadline for online submissions for the 2013 reporting period is 15 January 2014. To complete the online report, please visit the Department of Labour’s website and register for the on-line reporting.

    Originally posted 2013-09-24 17:26:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter