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IMPORTANT TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE FACILITATION

 

A.    BEFORE THE WORKSHOP

*         Schedule ample time for planning

*         Take some time to get to know each other

*         Discuss each other’s style of planning and facilitating

*         Avoid making assumptions about one another

*         Take time to discuss your views about the workshop topic

*         Especially examine areas of disagreement

*         Discuss any concerns about potential challenges that participants may present

*         Agree on common goals for workshop

*         Review each other’s triggers

*         Find out whether and when it is okay to interrupt

*         Decide how to keep track of time

*         Strategize about how to stick to the original outline and how to switch gears

*         Plan ways to give signals to one another

*         Divide facilitation of activities fairly

*         Share responsibility equally in preparing and bringing workshop materials and resources

*         Agree to arrive at the workshop site in time to set up and check-in before the workshop begins

*         Schedule time after the workshop to debrief

 

B.    DURING THE WORKSHOP

*         Remember to keep a professional demeanor at all times

*         Keep communicating with each other throughout the workshop

*         Support and validate one another

*         During activities that don’t require constant attention, check-in with one another

*         Include your co-facilitator even when you are leading an exercise or discussion, by asking, for example: “Do you have anything to add?”

*         Use lots of eye contact

*         Assert yourself if your co-facilitator is talking too much

*         Remember that it is okay to make mistakes

*         Take the initiative to step in if your co-facilitator misses an opportunity to address a myth

 

C.    AFTER THE WORKSHOP

*         If you can’t meet right after the workshop, schedule a time to debrief before you leave

*         Listen carefully to one another’s self-evaluation before giving feedback

*         Discuss what worked well

*         Examine what did not work

*         Brainstorm what could have been done differently

*         Use written evaluations as a reference point to talk about the workshop, and assess your effectiveness as co-facilitators

*         Name particular behaviors, for example: “When you kept interrupting me, I felt undermined and frustrated”, or “I got the impression that some participants were bored”, instead of “You always interrupt me” or “You were very controlling during the workshop.”

*         Realize the importance and potential difficulty of debriefing a challenging workshop

*         Make sure to share any clean-up or return of resource materials

*         REMEMBER: YOU HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE

10 Tips to Boost Your Facilitation Skills


  1. Do your homework.
     – Take the time to understand the problem to be solved, the key players involved in the meeting, and the “hot buttons” around the problem statement. Talk to the boss plus one or two of the key players who are on opposite sides of the problem statement. Resist the temptation of developing your own conclusions prior to the facilitation meeting, though. If you come across as jaded you’ll lose the trust of the meeting attendees.
  2. Articulate the problem statement. – Key to any facilitation meeting is a clear, crisp articulation of the problem statement and ensuring that all meeting attendees agree with the problem statement. Write down the problem statement on a whiteboard or easel in plain sight of the attendees so you can refer back to it throughout the meeting.
  3. Encourage inclusion of all attendees. – Take particular note of those who aren’t speaking up during the meeting. Look for opportune moments to ask them specific questions about what they think about a particular comment or issue being discussed. While encouraging inclusion is important, be cautious not to “pick on” any attendees and create an environment of discomfort.
  4. Keep things moving toward addressing the problem statement. – Frequently as a facilitator you’ll find that a discussion will drift off course and will not be contributing towards addressing the problem statement. Your job as facilitator is to keep the discussion moving forward while at the same time not being so rigid that you’ll frustrate your meeting attendees. If the discussion has drifted to addressing a different problem statement or if the discussion has become destructive, bring it back on course.
  5. Establish a “parking lot”. – Many times a facilitated meeting will uncover other important issues which should be captured but are not germane to solving the stated problem statement. Capture those items in a “parking lot” to be addressed in future discussions. Ensure the parking lot is visible to all attendees and refer back to it as necessary to keep your discussion focused.
  6. Maintain a list of action items. – Frequently during facilitated discussions specific actions relative to solving the problem statement will be revealed. Be diligent about capturing those action items and ensure they are clearly visible to all meeting attendees. Ensure that the action item addresses what needs to be done, who needs to do it, and when it needs to be done. Also take the time to summarize the action items at the end of the meeting to ensure everyone agrees as to the importance, assignment, and timing of the action items.
  7. Stay objective. – As a facilitator it is super important that you are perceived as completely objective and are not viewed as being in anyone’s “camp” during a discussion. Once a facilitator is viewed as biased then the trust of the meeting attendees (particularly those who are on the opposing side of the facilitator’s bias) will quickly be lost. Once you’ve lost the trust it’s difficult to regain, so stay objective and don’t reveal your biases.
  8. Discover through questioning, not preaching. – Facilitating doesn’t mean you get on your soapbox and start espousing your vast wisdom on the topic at hand. Facilitation means you use your wisdom to help others get to a common, agreed-upon resolution to problems. The best facilitators do so by asking pointed, specific questions which are relevant to the problem statement and designed to bring new facts to light. Once the facilitator starts pontificating then the meeting becomes more about the facilitator and less about the attendees solving the problem.
  9. Keep the boss from hijacking the discussion. – I’ve seen many, many facilitated discussions where the highest ranking person in the meeting expresses his or her opinion and subsequently sets the course of the meeting to his or her agenda. Once the boss states a perspective then those afraid to challenge him or her aren’t going to speak up. Have a discussion with the boss up front to ensure that he or she doesn’t jade the meeting.
  10. Be the one in control of the discussion. – As the facilitator you need to keep the meeting moving forward and avoid being rat-holed on some off-the-beaten-path discussion. This may mean wrestling control of the discussion from an outspoken attendee or shifting the discussion topic back to the problem statement. It’s isn’t always pleasant and you’re likely to tick someone off, but that’s your job. Lose control of the discussion and you’ll lose respect of the attendees.

Facilitation is one of the most important skills you as a consultant bring to the table in helping your client solve problems collaboratively. Keep these ten tips in mind when you are about to help your client solve its next tough problem.

Assessment Memo or Memorandum

Assessment Memo or Memorandum

 

This is the new monster on the block – we just don’t know who the daddy is.

 

RESEARCHED TERMS

We tried to research the topic. As of (date of research?) we found that none of these terms anywhere on the SAQA website or documentation, nor do they appear on any SETA website or documentation.

 

We cannot find any of these terms in the two official unit standards used by the ETDP SETA for OBE Programme Design, namely 123401 or 123394. We can’t find them on any of the ETDP SETA’s (The primary SETA of the Education Training and Development SETA) programme approval or evaluation documents.

 

This is of course the SETA that is responsible for the unit standard and the design of programmes. Never has this been requested or checked in the past during programme submission or previous verification.
Assessment Memo or Assessment Memorandum refers to a separate document needed during programme approval. When we checked the SETA’s requirements for programme approval or SETA verification, they only requested the following documents:

  1. a) Matrix/Programme application
  2. b) Learner Guide
  3. c) Workbook/Assessment Guide
  4. d) Assessment Guide and in some cases the
  5. e) Mentors Guide

 

Once again, there was no mention of the Assessment Memorandum again
We found a similar term on the unit standard 115755 used for “Assessment Design,” namely:

The guide includes all support material and/or references to support material, including observations sheets, checklists, possible or required sources of evidence and guidance on expected quality of evidence including exemplars, memoranda or rubrics as applicable.

 

I then went and looked the definitions of these two terms mentioned up. The first search result for memoranda read,

 

memoranda:noun, plural memorandums, memoranda. [mem-uh-ran-duh] /ˌmɛm əˈræn də/ ([reference to IPA]) a short note designating something to be remembered, especially something to be done or acted upon in the future; reminder. a record or written statement of something.

A note recording something for future use.

 

And also,

 

a written message in business or diplomacy.

 

As well as,

 

a document recording the terms of a contract or other legal details.

 

The other word pulled up these results –

 

rubrics:a heading on a document.

 

a set of instructions or rules.
CONCLUSION

We guess the Assessment Memo or Assessment Memorandum – terms that are not once used on any SETA or SAQA documents that relate to this process – must be this “memoranda or rubrics as applicable.”

 

This is a pity because there are no resources on the internet or any SETA reference that provide an explanation on this. It would eliminate a lot of confusion around this topic, especially for new Training Providers.

 

CREATING THE ASSESSMENT MEMO OR MEMORANDUM

Some argue that this could form part of the model answers of your Assessment Guide. But why, then, is it required as a separate document pack during verification? At any rate, this is how we would recommend creating the document going forward:

 

–                      Create a separate document calling it the Assessment Memo Cover Page that makes reference to your Unit Standard

details, and maybe give it a “confidential” watermark, footnote or disclaimer of some sort.

–                      Include model answers for each activity/assessment activity in this guide – we’re not recommending any particular

format. You may also want to include the following, depending on the topic or structure of your activities:
*                      Support material and/or references that were provided to the learner – which he/she can use as resources (we mean

resources and references that were given to the learner during the induction or facilitation).

*                      Observations sheets – these should be in the Assessment Guide already if used previously

*                      Checklists – to check if the learner’s response is complete or that all required activities were handed in.

*                      Possible or required sources of evidence – or of course your model answers, or guidelines on how learners were asked

or could answer the question.
*                      Expected quality of evidence – maybe include the amount of pages, size of response, number of words, how many

points will be allocated to this activity and so forth.

 

In the meantime, we hope that this helps, clears some confusion and possibly gives a direction forward.

 

115753 SETA Accredited Assessor Course

TRAINYOUCAN and its members is committed to follow all the ETQA requirements as stipulated by SAQA. Read more about TRAINING Fraud and Scam alerts here!

Assessor Training

PUBLIC Schedule for this course:  Click here

ADDITIONAL READING

COURSE SUMMARY

  • Short name:  Assessor Training
  • Full description: 115753 Conduct outcomes-based assessment
  • SETA Accredited: Yes, ETDP SETA NQF Accredited
  • SETA: Education, Training, Development & Practices Sector Education & Training Authority (ETDP Seta)  www.etdpseta.org.za
  • NQF: 5
  • Credits: 15
  • Duration: 3 days
  • Re-Assessment fees: None
  • Assignment extensions: Up to 18 months at no additional cost.
  • Hidden fees: None
  • Workshops: Weekly in Durban
  • Recognition: Based on the National Qualifications Framework that is Nationally Accepted in South Africa, Department of Labour and Microsoft Certified courses.
  • Success rate of learner: Currently we have a very high success rate due to the “one-price-policy” that include additional support at no additional cost.
  • POE Building: We don’t take any short-cuts such as POE building in the class and follow all the guidelines stipulated by SAQA and the SETA.
  • Location: Public courses in KZN Durban but we do from time to time schedule classes in Cape Town and Gauteng.

Note: Any person who wants to offer their services as an accredited individual, company or a training provider can only do so with a valid SOR (Statement of Results) from the ETDP SETA. No other document/certificate can be used, even if it reflects the same unit standard.

SUPPORTING STRUCTURES

Currently we have the following supporting structures in place for our members:

  • Telephone support 7 days a week.
  • Whatsapp –
    • Cell. 0825507946 Tel. 0867227014 English.
    • Cell. Zulu 0727372733 Tel. 0318115749 English/Zulu.
  • Helpdesk – www.trainyoucansupport.co.za – 7 days a week (integrated email and sms notifications).
  • Weekly workshops in Durban.
  • Skype support – contact helpdesk for details.
  • Members private forum with model answers to all  activities including JOB opportunities.
  • Private Members forum on www.trainyoucanforum.co.za.
  • FREE members video blog on Youtube. www.youcantrain.co.za
  • JOB opportunities for FREELANCERS. www.skillsjobs.co.za and www.trainingdirect.co.za

Skills-Forum

 

Youtube

COURSE DETAIL

  •  This course is based on the Unit Standards 115753 – click here to read more
  • People credited with this unit standard are able to:
    • Demonstrate understanding of outcomes-based assessment;
    • Prepare for assessments;
    • Conduct assessments;
    • Provide feedback on assessments; and
    • Review assessments.
  • Purpose of the course:
    • This generic assessor unit standard is for those who assess people for their achievement of learning outcomes in terms of specified criteria using pre-designed assessment instruments. The outcomes and criteria may be defined in a range of documents including but not limited to unit standards, exit level outcomes, assessment standards, curriculum statements and qualifications.
    • Those who achieve this unit standard will be able to conduct assessments within their fields of expertise. This unit standard will contribute towards the achievement of a variety of qualifications, particularly within the fields of Education Training and Development Practices and Human Resource Development.
    • People credited with this unit standard are able to carry out assessments in a fair, valid, reliable and practicable manner that is free of all bias and discrimination, paying particular attention to the three groups targeted for redress: race, gender and disability.
  • Each learner will receive a learner guide and workbook during the contact session that will assist them with the building of their POE (Portfolio of Evidence).
  • Learner will receive full instruction from us before the course to assist with the preparation of the course. Where possible additional resources will be provided to learners who are not able to get there resources.
  • Learners are required to apply skills and knowledge obtained on the course in the workplace. As learners apply these skills, they produce evidence, which needs to be compiled into a portfolio of evidence (POE). This POE is submitted to Trainyoucan for assessment. Learners will receive a workbook and portfolio guide, which will guide them through the process. Any additional resources required will be provided by Trainyoucan to the learner, free of charge.

BONUS DISCUSSIONS AND HANDOUTS DURING THIS COURSE

As a valued customer the following is included as standard practices in TRAINYOUCAN induction of accredited course, namely:

  1. Detailed induction of the SETA, SAQA, NQF and Credits.
  2. Detailed explanation on the types of accreditation found, namely individual, training provider and programme accreditation.
  3. Difference between unit standards and qualifications with detailed explanation.
  4. FREE templates and resources on this topic, ready to be downloaded to use from our members forum.
  5. FREE resources on compiling your personal CV and registration with the SETA for Assessors and Moderators.
  6. Learners will complete 1 x complete Assessment in the class and 1 x complete Assessment on their own. TRAINYOUCAN will provide copies of Assessment guides.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

  • Training Manager
  • Mentors & Coaches
  • HR Persons
  • Training Administrators
  • Training Providers or newly registered Training Providers
  • Accredited and NON-Accredited Employee/Training Providers
  • Lecturers at Technicons, Private Colleges or Universities.
  • Managers who need to assess their staff
  • Persons with no formal experience of the SETA and the NQF
  • Recruitment Staff
  • Learning material developers looking to enhance their programmes
  • Anyone else who can benefit from assessment methodologies
  • New training providers applying for accreditation
  • Employers running learnerships.
  • Learners studying towards their ETDP Qualification

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

The following types of JOB opportunities exist in the Educational Industry;

  • Qualified Trainers and Assessors who offer their services as FREELANCERS. (People who are contracted-in by companies to perform training functions).
  • Permanent employment opportunities for individuals with Training Providers as qualified Trainers, Assessors and Training Administrators.
  • Appointed Training Managers in Corporate Companies.
  • Lecturers at both public and private colleges.
  • Microsoft Certified and Department of Labour Special Projects  (Qualified Trainer Certificate as entry level requirement)
  • Developers of course material for both short and NQF aligned courses.
  • International JOB opportunities in the Education Field, based on the Outcomes Based Education or Common Core principles.
  • SETA Project Managers, both internally and externally.
  • HR related vacancies – becoming industry requirement with recruitment agencies.
  • Industry specialist who want a change in career.
  • Individuals who retire and want to generate additional income in their spare time.
  • Self motivated individuals who offer part time courses on weekends or in their spare time.

ENROLMENT REQUIREMENTS

  • The credit calculation is based on the assumption that learners are already competent in the learning area in which they will provide training. (Have scope or experience to train in a specific field.)
  • Basic communication skills (English = reading and writing skills on a NQF level 4 (Metric Level))
  • Able to attend the contact session and any of our workshops offered.
  • Access to email and where possible to the internet for research.

Learner preparation for the contact session (Classroom Training)

a) COMPULSORY:

  • Attending the full contact session. (Classroom Session)
  • Copy of ID and CV for registration purposes. (Indicating previous workplace experience)
  • Pen and paper.
  • A4 lever arch file + 12 dividers. (Cheap dividers)
  • Organisation or Provider policies where available or at least knowledge of the organisations assessment policy if any. These might include: *The assessment Policy of your organisation, The Moderation Policy of your organisation, The RPL Policy of your organisation, The re-assessment policy of your organisation, The appeals policy of your organisation. Where possible will TRAINYOUCAN provide template policies to learners who do not have access to these policies.
  • Copy of your organisations Assessment Guides if any implemented.
  • Visit your SETA’s website and determine if they have any policies or rules of contact for their assessors available. Where not possible will TRAINYOUCAN provide a copy of this.
  • Visit any SETA of your choice and obtain a copy of the Assessors Registration template that you must complete on completion and submit to your SETA. This is very helpful if you have any questions or answers regarding the completion of this document. (Where possible will TRAINYOUCAN provide copies of this.

b) OPTIONAL: (Not required but for those who want to start with the research)

  • Laptop, I-Apple, I-Pot or I-Orange : Please bring! We will provide FREE WIFI Spot.
  • Internet access to view additional support on our Forum

115753 notional hours

PROCESS FLOW

  1. Enrol as a learner with Trainyoucan by completing the application form. (PDF document or the online enrolment)
  2. Attend the contact session with Trainyoucan. (Each course starts with a 2 hour induction on the SETA’s and explaining the accreditation process. (Most of the learners find this very useful.)
  3. We provide you with all the learning material that you need, including a workbook that you must complete. (Outside the classroom as required by the Unit Standard and OBE Learning)
  4. You complete the workbook and submit this to our offices for assessments, or you can attend any of our FREE workshops for additional support. Any person who attended any of our courses can attend our workshops for FREE. One of the assessors can also evaluate your POE (Portfolio of Evidence) during the workshop and provide you feedback immediately.
  5. Your POE is submitted to our Assessors that will complete the assessment process and provide directly feedback to you through our online tracking system.
  6. Your file is scheduled for verification with the relevant SETA and uploaded on completion. Your final Certificate will only be issued once the SETA verified your POE for security reasons and a final SOR will be issues. (SOR, also called the “Statement of Results” will be issued by the relevant SETA once the process was completed). You MUST receive your SOR one completion from any provider as proof that you were registered. NO SOR = NO ACCREDITATION. (Bear in mind that this process can take up to 3 months to complete.
  7. We provide you with all the guidance and resources to register with the relevant SETA of your choice.

OBE Learning Process

ACCREDITATION AND QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK

The criteria for the accreditation of training providers define a number of requirements that include:

  • Administrative procedures and record keeping and policies.
  • Management review
  • Authorization of affiliates
  • Tutor selection, training and performance review
  • Issuance of training certificates
  • Learner Support
  • Delivery, Assessment and Moderation practices

NOTE: There are basically two different types of accreditation:

  1. The training provider or the institute must be accredited by a SETA. “ETQA” (Their offices, policies and procedures. This can be any SETA = does not matter what type of courses they offer.)
  2. Each learning programme or qualification is accredited with the relevant SETA “ETQA” who is responsible for this programme. Also note that the word “accreditation” does not mean they SETA accredited. It must say “NQF Accredited”.

 Before you can start with any course you should ask the following questions:

  • Is the course accredited and with what SETA?
  • What is the process and duration from start to completion?
  • Are there any additional fees for support to re-submission?
  • Entry Requirements? Do you charge for registration and why?
  • What discount can I get if I do more courses with your institute?
  • What after support and resources to you offer?

10 Tips to Boost Your Facilitation Skills


  1. Do your homework.
     – Take the time to understand the problem to be solved, the key players involved in the meeting, and the “hot buttons” around the problem statement. Talk to the boss plus one or two of the key players who are on opposite sides of the problem statement. Resist the temptation of developing your own conclusions prior to the facilitation meeting, though. If you come across as jaded you’ll lose the trust of the meeting attendees.
  2. Articulate the problem statement. – Key to any facilitation meeting is a clear, crisp articulation of the problem statement and ensuring that all meeting attendees agree with the problem statement. Write down the problem statement on a whiteboard or easel in plain sight of the attendees so you can refer back to it throughout the meeting.
  3. Encourage inclusion of all attendees. – Take particular note of those who aren’t speaking up during the meeting. Look for opportune moments to ask them specific questions about what they think about a particular comment or issue being discussed. While encouraging inclusion is important, be cautious not to “pick on” any attendees and create an environment of discomfort.
  4. Keep things moving toward addressing the problem statement. – Frequently as a facilitator you’ll find that a discussion will drift off course and will not be contributing towards addressing the problem statement. Your job as facilitator is to keep the discussion moving forward while at the same time not being so rigid that you’ll frustrate your meeting attendees. If the discussion has drifted to addressing a different problem statement or if the discussion has become destructive, bring it back on course.
  5. Establish a “parking lot”. – Many times a facilitated meeting will uncover other important issues which should be captured but are not germane to solving the stated problem statement. Capture those items in a “parking lot” to be addressed in future discussions. Ensure the parking lot is visible to all attendees and refer back to it as necessary to keep your discussion focused.
  6. Maintain a list of action items. – Frequently during facilitated discussions specific actions relative to solving the problem statement will be revealed. Be diligent about capturing those action items and ensure they are clearly visible to all meeting attendees. Ensure that the action item addresses what needs to be done, who needs to do it, and when it needs to be done. Also take the time to summarize the action items at the end of the meeting to ensure everyone agrees as to the importance, assignment, and timing of the action items.
  7. Stay objective. – As a facilitator it is super important that you are perceived as completely objective and are not viewed as being in anyone’s “camp” during a discussion. Once a facilitator is viewed as biased then the trust of the meeting attendees (particularly those who are on the opposing side of the facilitator’s bias) will quickly be lost. Once you’ve lost the trust it’s difficult to regain, so stay objective and don’t reveal your biases.
  8. Discover through questioning, not preaching. – Facilitating doesn’t mean you get on your soapbox and start espousing your vast wisdom on the topic at hand. Facilitation means you use your wisdom to help others get to a common, agreed-upon resolution to problems. The best facilitators do so by asking pointed, specific questions which are relevant to the problem statement and designed to bring new facts to light. Once the facilitator starts pontificating then the meeting becomes more about the facilitator and less about the attendees solving the problem.
  9. Keep the boss from hijacking the discussion. – I’ve seen many, many facilitated discussions where the highest ranking person in the meeting expresses his or her opinion and subsequently sets the course of the meeting to his or her agenda. Once the boss states a perspective then those afraid to challenge him or her aren’t going to speak up. Have a discussion with the boss up front to ensure that he or she doesn’t jade the meeting.
  10. Be the one in control of the discussion. – As the facilitator you need to keep the meeting moving forward and avoid being rat-holed on some off-the-beaten-path discussion. This may mean wrestling control of the discussion from an outspoken attendee or shifting the discussion topic back to the problem statement. It’s isn’t always pleasant and you’re likely to tick someone off, but that’s your job. Lose control of the discussion and you’ll lose respect of the attendees.

Facilitation is one of the most important skills you as a consultant bring to the table in helping your client solve problems collaboratively. Keep these ten tips in mind when you are about to help your client solve its next tough problem.