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ethics

QCTO

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About the QCTO 

Quality Council for Trades & Occupations

The QCTO is one of the three Quality Councils provided for in the National Qualifications Framework Act (NQF Act No. 67 of 2008).

The QCTO was established under the Skills Development Act as amended in 2008 and became operational on the 1st April 2010 following the publication of Government Gazette No 33059, 1st April 2010

1. Vision

    QCTO vision is to qualify a skilled and capable workforce.

2. Mission

    The QCTO’s mission is to effectively and efficiently manage the occupational qualifications sub-framework in order to set standards, develop and quality assure national occupational qualifications for all who want a trade or occupation and, where appropriate, professions.

3. Values

Innovation and Excellence

    We rise to opportunities and challenges, we continuously learn, we are innovative and we consistently produce work of distinction and fine quality, on time, and in line with our clients’ needs.

Empowerment and Recognition

    • We enable people to make things happen, we encourage and support one another when and where needed, and we celebrate successful accomplishment of work.

 

Respect and Dignity

    We value and show consideration for all the people we work with, treat one another with kindness and thoughtfulness, and embrace inclusivity.

Ethics and Integrity

    We embrace and practice a moral code of trustworthiness, honesty and truthfulness in everything we say and do, and we honour our promises and commitments.

Ownership and Accountability

    We take ownership of our responsibilities and we answer for our decisions and actions.

Authenticity

    We protect the public by issuing authentic, quality qualifications.

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Now you can also visit the public discussion on QCTO related topics here.

Ethics and Protocol in the Workplace

As 21st century companies face more stringent governmental and societal expectations with regard to ethics, many are developing ethical codes of conduct for the workplace. Company leaders set the tone for ethics in any organization, but they also establish expectations for employees and workplace conduct to require all employees to participate in ethical decision making.

Moral Judgment
Cornelius von Baeyer is a European management consultant who specializes in workplace ethics. In his 1999 “What’s Workplace Ethics” article, he explains that organizational ethics sit between the law and religion. His point is that established legal principles formalize expectations while religion represents personal appreciation for virtue. Part of von Baeyer’s job is to help managers and employees in organizations understand the common ethical dilemmas they face and, through discussion, help them consistently respond to these dilemmas with ethical principles.

Ethical Code
Most medium- to large-sized companies have ethical codes of conducts to guide employees in ethical decision making. Ethical codes are grounded in an organization’s guiding values, and a code of conduct specifies behaviors that are either expected or prohibited, explains von Baeyer, who also helps businesses develop effective codes. Company conduct codes should extend beyond legal precedent to guide employees in making appropriate business decisions in lieu of assistance from management.

Training
Ethics and workplace protocol require ongoing training, notes Business Training Media President Myron Curry in his article “Ethics in the Workplace.” Curry and his company believe that ethical codes are not enough to deter unethical behavior. He suggests that companies consistently review ethical decisions with employees and provide ongoing training for workers. While routine ethics training comes with a cost, Curry is quick to point out that the expenses that can occur without well-trained employees are often much more expensive and can include “devastating lawsuits, negative publicity, wasted time, loss of money, and low employee morale.”